Terminating The Need To Register In Arkansas As A Sex Offender

Arkansas law allows for convicted sex offenders to terminate their obligation to register. This topic is currently receiving attention in our state as the waiting requirement to request termination has now passed for certain persons. If you have been convicted of a sex offense in Arkansas, and you meet the requirements discussed below, then contact Accessible Legal Services at 501-620-4242 to begin the process of terminating your registration requirements.

Arkansas allows for those convicted of a sex offense to request that they no longer be required to register

Arkansas’ criminal code allows one to request an Order from the Court stating that they no longer be required to register as a sex offender. Arkansas Code 12-12-919 allows for one to apply for termination of the registration requirement if it has been fifteen years since they were released from prison or since they were first placed on probation. The first step of ending the obligation to register is to file an application with the Court. The Court will schedule a hearing at which the prosecutor may request that registration requirements continue. The State will be permitted to call witnesses and present evidence in support of any claim that one should remain required to register as a sex offender in Arkansas.

Terminating the requirement to register as a sex offender can have enormous benefits. Termination means that one no longer has to worry about their neighbors finding out through a database that they have been convicted of a sex offense. Terminating the obligation also reduces the risk that one will pick up a new charge for failing to register or updating basic information such a home address. Our lawyers are able to assist those eligible under Arkansas law to terminate the need to register as a sex offender.

Arkansas residents wishing to terminate their sex offender registration requirements should contact an attorney

If you wish to terminate Arkansas’ requirement that you register as a sex offender then you should contact an attorney immediately. The process of terminating the registration requirement involves several steps in the legal process and making a mistake can result in your application being denied. Properly applying for termination of the requirement means that the correct paperwork must be properly filed with the court. It also requires that a proper notice of the hearing be timely given to the prosecutor. Also, should the prosecutor dispute the termination then having a qualified attorney to argue on your behalf can possibly make the difference between your application being granted or denied.

It is not advisable that you go through the process alone. Call our office today at 501-620-4242 with help through this process.

How To Expunge An Arrest Record

If you are like many people in Arkansas who have a RAP sheet, you have wondered how to expunge an arrest record.

 

Fortunately, many people who have arrest records are eligible to expunge them—it is just a matter of knowing what to do, which forms to file, and where to file the petition. For that reason, most people choose to work with an expungement attorney who understands the law and how it applies in different cases.

Expungement is not a simple process, and many people choose to have an attorney walk them through the process to ensure that they get the best possible outcome.

The first thing you need to expunge your arrests is obtain your complete criminal history. You can get a copy of your rap sheet (that stands for record of arrests and prosecutions) from the agency that arrested you, or you can obtain a copy from ACIC.

Once your lawyer has reviewed your record, she will determine whether you are eligible for expungement or criminal record sealing. If you are eligible, she’ll prepare and file all the documents necessary to clear your name.

What if the Court Won’t Let You Expunge Your Arrest Record?

The court does not have to grant your request to expunge or seal your criminal record. If the state’s attorney objects to your expungement or sealing, your lawyer will be able to argue your case in front of a judge.

What Else Can You Expunge (Besides an Arrest Record)?

In some cases, if you were found guilty of a crime and placed on court supervision, and you successfully completed the term of supervision (and maintained a clean criminal record since then), you could be eligible for expungement or sealing.

Do You Need to Talk to an Attorney About How to Expunge Your Arrest Record?

If you’re thinking about expunging your arrest record, we may be able to help you.

Call Accessible Legal Services at 501-620-4242 for a free case review today. We will look at your situation and start developing a strategy that gets you the best possible outcome.

What is the Criminal Expungment Process?

For many people, the process of expunging or sealing a criminal record is a complicated one—but it does not have to be that way. Working with an expungement attorney from the moment you decide to clear your criminal record can make things simpler (and save you time).

Before you can petition the court to clear your criminal record, you will need a complete copy of that record. You can get your own criminal record by contacting the agency where you were processed, or you can ask request your criminal record from Arkansas Crime Information Center (ACIC).

Once you have your entire criminal record, you can determine whether you are eligible to have your criminal record sealed or expunged. If you are not, you could still be eligible for a pardon through the Governor’s office.

When your attorney determines that you are eligible for expungement, she will file the appropriate petition with the court, and that is the first step in clearing your name and getting the fresh start you deserve.

In some cases, the state’s attorney—the lawyer that represents the State’s best interests in criminal cases—will object to an expungement. If that happens in your case, you may be entitled to a hearing where you can explain your side of the story. Your lawyer can argue on your behalf if the state objects to your petition.

If the judge in your case approves your expungement, the court will order the law enforcement agencies that have your criminal records to seal them.

If you need to talk to an attorney about clearing your name so you can move forward and leave the past behind, call us right away at 501-620-4242 for a free case evaluation. We will look at your record and explain your options, and then we will develop a strategy that gets you the best possible outcome.

Record Expungement and Financial Aid

Many individuals in our nation aspire to earn a college degree and pursue higher education as a starting point towards a high paying and successful career.  In 1998, Congress enacted and amended the Higher Education Act (HEA), which prevented thousands of would-be college students from receiving federal financial assistance if they had a drug related conviction.  Since the law was enacted, one in every four hundred students who apply to receive financial aid will be denied based on a prior drug related conviction.

Those who are affected by this unfortunate reality will often never have the opportunity to receive federal financial aid unless they expunge the prior offense from their record.

How can you tell if your conviction will affect your ability to obtain financial aid?  The Federal Student Aid department has a FAFSA Drug Conviction Worksheet which will let you determine whether you will have a problem obtaining financial aid.

For those who are convicted of a drug related crime, you are eligible to expunge your record.  At Accessible Legal Service, Inc., we have a wealth of experience working with potential students that need to seal or expunge their past offenses in order to get financial assistance.  If you need to speak to an attorney about expunging your criminal record, please contact us at 501-620-4242.